2.231 mm Pitch Turbo Coil 12" Long [25 mm (1"), Black] (100/Box) Item#33TC25BLAC
64.09 NewCondition InStock

2.231 mm Pitch Turbo Coil 12" Long [25 mm (1"), Black] (100/Box) Item#33TC25BLAC

Item #: 33TC25BLAC
Brand: Binding101
  • Bigger, stronger, and faster than your average coil
  • Ideal for binding hard to bind thick books .
  • Available in sizes from 20mm (3/4") to 50mm (2")
  • 12" Long
Bulk Pricing AvailableClick or Call (866) 537-2244
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  • Brand New

$64.09

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This item is made-to-order and non-returnable.

Overview

Spiral binding spines are the most popular form of document binding because of their flexibility, their affordability, and the huge variety of colors and sizes to choose from. These 2.231mm Pitch Black TurboCoil Spiral Binding Coils are available in sizes from 20mm up to 50mm. Ideal for binding hard to bind thick books .

Specifications

Item #33TC25BLAC
ManufacturerBinding101
Length12"
Pitch2.231 mm
ColorBlack
Diameter25mm
QuantityVaries Depending on Size
Make a Selection for Details
Sheet CapacityVaries Depending on Size
View the Chart in the Product Description for Details
Recommended Book ThicknessVaries Depending on Size
View the Chart in the Product Description for Details
Binding StyleSpiral Binding / Plastic Coil

Description

2.231mm Pitch Black TurboCoil Spiral Binding Coil is specifically designed to make binding large books easier and faster. It is bigger, stronger, and faster than your standard spiral coil. This 12" long TurboCoil is available in sizes from 20mm (3/4") to 50mm (2") and is manufactured with a 0.135 gauge filament, the thickest filament available for plastic coil book binding. Designed for use with a 2.231 mm punching die that offers a 0.172 hole size, this larger punching hole provides for faster insertion with less resistance. This binding coil is CPSIA Phthalate and Lead-Free certified. Increase productivity and profit on hard to bind thick books with 2.231mm Pitch Black TurboCoil. Also available in Clear and White colors.

Choose a Coil Size / Diameter

Now choose your coil diameter for your page capacity. You can use the capacity chart here to help choose the best size based on your stack thickness or an estimate of your sheet capacity. Finding how to choose the best coil size is easier than you may think with our capacity chart. There is also a general rule with 3 simple steps to get the proper fit for any kind of binding that works as well: ① Take the book being bound and lay it flat on a table. ② Don't compress the paper and measure the thickness of the binding edge. ③ Take the measurement and add 1/8" - that will be the size of the binding element recommended for your document thickness.

SizeStack CapacitySheet Capacity*
20mm11/16" Thick Stack161-170 Sheets
22mm3/4" Thick Stack181-200 Sheets
25mm13/16" Thick Stack211-230 Sheets
28mm7/8" Thick Stack231-250 Sheets
30mm1" Thick Book251-270 Sheets
32mm1 116" Thick Stack271-290 Sheets
35mm1 ¼" Thick Stack291-320 Sheets
38mm1 ⅜" Thick Stack300-320 Sheets
40mm1 ½" Thick Stack321-350 Sheets
45mm1 916" Thick Stack351-390 Sheets
50mm1 ¾" Thick Stack391-440 Sheets


* You will also see that we offer a "sheet capacity" rating above. Using this method of size selection may be less accurate, as it was calculated using all 20 lb. bond paper, with no covers and no other paper stocks. The actual sheet capacity will vary depending on what paper stock and covers you are using. For this reason, we recommend you use the stack capacity for a more accurate fit. All of these capacities are approximations.

Videos

Overview of Spiral Coil Binding Supplies

Transcript: Subscribe to our YouTube channel ► https://www.youtube.com/c/binding101

Plastic coil binding, also called Spiral Binding, is an incredibly durable and flexible way to bind books, making it one of the most popular document binding solutions on the market today.

A binding coil looks like a phone cord, with a continuous plastic spine that spins around into many loops. The coils are spun into several closely spaced holes that are either round or oval shaped, punched along the edge of a book....
Read More
Subscribe to our YouTube channel ► https://www.youtube.com/c/binding101

Plastic coil binding, also called Spiral Binding, is an incredibly durable and flexible way to bind books, making it one of the most popular document binding solutions on the market today.

A binding coil looks like a phone cord, with a continuous plastic spine that spins around into many loops. The coils are spun into several closely spaced holes that are either round or oval shaped, punched along the edge of a book.

They are made of a very flexible plastic material that can bend in all directions, and still retain its original shape. This makes them very durable, and able to withstand heavy handling.

Binding coils come in a large variety of colors and sizes to bind books up to about 440 sheets, or a 1-3/4” thick stack.

To bind with spiral binding, you will need a coil binding machine, the coils themselves, and a pair of cutter crimper pliers. You can also use an electric coil inserter for higher volumes to drastically increase the inserting speed.

Just punch your pages, roll the coil through the holes, and then crimp in the ends. Once bound, your books can lay completely flat and pages can turn a full 360°.

For more information or to buy spiral binding coils online, visit us at Binding101.com, or call the number on your screen. And don’t forget to subscribe for more how to videos and tutorials from Binding101.

Spiral Coil Binding FAQs

Transcript: Subscribe to our YouTube channel ► https://www.youtube.com/c/binding101

Hey everyone, it’s Mallory from Binding101 and today I am going to answer your FAQs about spiral coil binding. Let’s get started…

1. What does “pitch” mean?
In simple terms, “pitch” refers to the hole spacing. 4:1 pitch is the standard for spiral binding coils, which means that there are 4 holes for every inch of binding. So an 11” binding edge would have either 43 or 44 holes, depending on the margi...
Read More
Subscribe to our YouTube channel ► https://www.youtube.com/c/binding101

Hey everyone, it’s Mallory from Binding101 and today I am going to answer your FAQs about spiral coil binding. Let’s get started…

1. What does “pitch” mean?
In simple terms, “pitch” refers to the hole spacing. 4:1 pitch is the standard for spiral binding coils, which means that there are 4 holes for every inch of binding. So an 11” binding edge would have either 43 or 44 holes, depending on the margin size. 5:1 is also available for specialty needs.


2. How do I choose a coil size?
Lay your stack of papers, including covers, on a table and measure the thickness, without pressing the stack down. Add 1/8 of an inch to that measurement and THAt is your recommended binding size. You can also use our handy chart that shows the capacity for each size, which I will link to below.

3. Can I get a bulk discount?
Absolutely! We can usually begin offering discounted prices when you buy 10 or more boxes of coils. Call or email us to see if your order will qualify.

4. What gauge is the coil?
The gauge of the coil –which refers to the thickness of the plastic—starts at 63 and thickens as the coils get larger, topping off at 103 gauge. I will link below to a full chart.

5. What colors are available?
We stock white, black, maroon, red, clear, blue, navy, and forest green binding coils. We also have special order colors that can usually be made in just a few days, including purple, pink, yellow, brown, gold, pearl white, many shades of blue, and more.

6. What is the largest book I can make with coil?
The largest binding coil is 50mm or 2”, which will hold about 440 sheets of copy paper, or about a 1 and ¾ inch thick book.

Have a question we didn’t answer? Call the number on your screen or visit Binding101.com for more information. And if this video was helpful, give it a thumbs up and be sure to subscribe for more.

5 Reasons why People Prefer Spiral Binding Coils

Transcript: Subscribe to our YouTube channel ► https://www.youtube.com/c/binding101

Welcome to Binding101! Today we are going to share 5 reasons why our customers feel Spiral Binding Coils are the best way to bind documents.

#1 - They are durable!
Binding coils are made of a flexible plastic that bounces back. You can bend them any which way, helicopter them, or use them as cat toys and they will still bounce-back to their original shape.

Reason #2 - They come in a ton of colors!
You can choo...
Read More
Subscribe to our YouTube channel ► https://www.youtube.com/c/binding101

Welcome to Binding101! Today we are going to share 5 reasons why our customers feel Spiral Binding Coils are the best way to bind documents.

#1 - They are durable!
Binding coils are made of a flexible plastic that bounces back. You can bend them any which way, helicopter them, or use them as cat toys and they will still bounce-back to their original shape.

Reason #2 - They come in a ton of colors!
You can choose from 8 stocked colors, as well as more than 15 special order colors that can usually be made in just a few days. This includes pink coils, yellows, a large range of blues, and many more.

Reason #3 – They are easy to bind with!
Even though there is the added step over wire to crimp in the ends of coils, our customers still agree that it is a simpler way to bind because you don’t have to close them around your pages, so the coil is always perfectly round and consistent.

#4 – They are affordable!
Binding coils are priced in the middle range of the punch-and-bind solutions, starting at only about 5 cents each.

And reason #5 – They are more fun!

So what do you think? Do you agree, or do you have a different favorite? Comment below or email us at info@binding101.com for a chance to be featured on our blog.

For more information or to buy spiral binding coils online, call the number on your screen. And don’t forget to subscribe for more. Thanks for watching!

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